Diagnosing problems in your pull

Did the rope move out of the vertical line?

  1. Then your pull was probably not in a vertical line.
  2. Much more rarely, if you pulled in a vertical line, then your hands rotated away from the vertical during the upper part of your pull or as they rose on the way back up.

Did the rope swing back toward you after your pull?

Then you threw out during your pull.

Did the rope move around near the floor at the end your backstroke?

Then you did not extend your arms at the bottom and flick your wrists.

Did the rope do a little spiral or shake on the way back up after your handstroke?

Then you released too late.

Is your bell ringing down?

  1. Are you letting the bell rise at the end of your handstroke?
    1. Are you letting your arms extend at the top of your stroke?
    2. Are you catching too high on the sally?
  2. Are you letting the bell rise at the end of your backstroke?
    1. Are you letting your arms extend at the top of your stroke?
    2. Are you too high on the tail?
  3. Are you giving a long straight pull at each backstroke?
    1. Are you too low on the tail, and thus not able to extend your arms at the top?
    2. Are you extending your arms fully at the bottom?
    3. Are you flicking your wrist and pushing with your right thumb?
  4. Are you giving a long straight pull at each handstroke?
    1. Are you catching too low on the sally, and thus not able to extend your arms at the top?
    2. Are you releasing too soon?
    3. Are you following through all the way down, with the same motion as for a backstroke?

Did the end of the tail flail about?

(This is only a problem when there is a long length of tail below your left hand; usually this occurs only for tall ringers who do not wish to take a knot.)

Your right hand necessarily rotates at the bottom of our pull as you flick your wrists, and then as you un-flick them on the way back up. Relative to your right hand, there are several possibilities for your left hand:

  1. Your left hand can stay aligned with your right (in the sense that the cylinder of your left hand’s grip is lined up with the cylinder of your right hand’s grip); or
  2. Your left hand can rotate more slowly than your right hand (or rarely more quickly, which if it occurs always causes flailing); or
  3. (This is never desirable) your left hand can rotate further.

As a result, there are several ways to reduce the flailing.

  1. First try keeping your left hand aligned with your right throughout your pull. Depending on your height and ringing style, this may fix it.
  2. If that is not sufficient, try rotating your left hand more slowly than your right, so that its change of angle trails the change of angle of your right hand.

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